Everything you Learned about Wedding Ceremonies from Married at First Sight is WRONG

 
by Jennifer Cram (13/09/2016)  | Categories: | Wedding Ceremony |
#MAFS banned signMarried at First Sight and similar reality TV shows featuring weddings are increasingly becoming the point of reference for couples who come to see me about getting married. Unfortunately, this show is about the worst wedding manual you could choose, because virtually everything about how those weddings are arranged and staged is wrong!

Forget about the legal side. Channel 9 has come clean that these are not legal marriages. (Refresher - you both have to know the person you're marrying and you have to lodge a Notice of Intended Marriage with your chosen celebrant at least a month before the big day).

What I'm talking about is how the ceremony is staged - who stands where, where you face and who participates - together with the content of the ceremony.
  • The groom definitely doesn't have to stand up the front, with his back to the bride until she's standing next Testimonial about Jennifer
                      Cram, Brisbane Marriage Celebrantto him. In fact he can walk in with the bride. Or, if he is standing up the front, he should be facing the bride and step forward to greet her and whoever escorts her down the aisle
  • The bride and groom do not have to stand with their backs to everyone. Standing facing your guests is so much warmer, and they can see the joy on your faces and you can see the love and support on theirs
  • The celebrant doesn't have to be the centre of attention and the only one facing the guests. It is NOT about the celebrant. Read my earlier post about imprinting - a menage a trois is not the picture of you as a married couple that you would want your guests to carry away with them.
  • The guests do not have to take sides - hopefully they are there for you as a couple and therefore shouldn't need to be kept apart
  • The celebrant definitely doesn't have to be holding a folder as big as all of outdoors. I use a discrete small folder for the ceremony script because no-one wants the celebrant's folder to be a central feature in the photos
  • And the ceremony doesn't have to be short and impersonal - you know one another, you have a history, and that history, with all its funny moments, can and should be a rich source to dip into to ensure that the ceremony is a very personal one.