So Coronavirus Cancelled Your Wedding ... What Now?

 
by Jennifer Cram - Brisbane Marriage Celebrant  (23/03/2020)  |  Categories: | Wedding Ceremony | Wedding Planning

Pink Peonies on a blue background with
                        the words New PlanYou've been thrown a curve ball that means your wedding can't go ahead on the day you've planned for, or, can't go ahead the way you've planned it. Closure of venues, restrictions on the number of people who can be in both indoor and outdoor spaces, travel restrictions, social distancing, and a lot of uncertainty because we have no idea how long this will last.

When the sun comes up on the day that was supposed to be your wedding day, it will be perfectly normal to feel as if your wedding has been cancelled, even though your various vendors will be doing their level best to work with you to reschedule your wedding, and to offer you a range of alternatives, from transplanting the complete wedding to a new date, to quite radical changes, including having more than one wedding.

Plan for a special day on the original date

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One of the alternatives, still available at the moment, is to have a very small ceremony - where you all stand .15 metres apart - that gets you legally married. So you can start your married life on the day planned.

But even if both your legal marriage and your wedding can't go ahead, you can still acknowledge and celebrate the original date in special ways
  • Dress up
  • Read your vows to one another
  • Share a bottle of bubbly, toasting one another and your commitment
  • Borrow something from your wedding theme, colour scheme, or menu to add to the vibe
  • Ask someone to take some photos that capture not only the two of you, but evokes the situation. Perhaps a photo taken from outside, looking through a closed window to the two of you isolated on the inside. Along with lots of other photos and selfies
  • Make a video in which you talk about what has happened, and how you are feeling on the day that would have been your wedding day. Not only will it make a wonderful keepsake, you can share it with your nearest and dearest, or with everyone who was invited to share this day with you. Or you can play it at your reception.

Prepare for the new date - whenever it happens

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One thing that couples often tell me is that they had no idea how much time and effort planning a wedding takes. It isn't uncommon for plans for DIY projects to be trimmed back or dropped as the reality sinks in. A postponed wedding means you'll have extra time to do things that don't have to be done at the last minute, and also time to learn new skills that can be used in the process. Love the symbolism of 1000 paper cranes? You've got time to fold them. Want to craft centrepieces, or make a little gift for your guests. You've got time to do that. You've also got extra time to focus on your ceremony and work on your vows!

Document, Document, Document

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This is an unprecedented situation. But that also means that, in the years to come, the story of the bumpy road to your wedding will be of great interest to your and friends and family So write or vlog about it, as it is unfolding. Keep relevant bits and pieces. photographs, your postponement, re-invite,  and so-on. They will also be a rich resource when you come to plan your renewal of vows on your 25th or 50th anniversary.

Keep focused on the big picture

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This pandemic will pass. And though the wedding you eventually have may be different from the wedding you originally planned there are many things that won't change.
  • your commitment to the person you're marrying
  • the love of friends and loved ones that will surround you on the day
  • the dedication and commitment of your dream team, those who will pull out all the stops to make your wedding happen

And Don't Forget

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When this has all settled, and your wedding has finally happened, you will have some great stories to tell

Jenny xxx Let's talk soon about how you
                        can have the best ceremony ever


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